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Selections from the June issue
June 2010 issue

Troubled Youth
“Why keep torturing yourself about fame and art?”
Essay by Poe Ballantine

Shoeless
Love and violence in a cheap motel
Fiction by Laurel Leigh

Taking Chances
With a spooked horse, a homeless stranger, a loaded gun
Personal stories by our readers

 

Plus: Poetry by Alison Luterman, Sy Safransky's Notebook, and Sunbeams

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Favorite from the archives
August 2000 issue

Old Soul: How Aging Reveals Character — A Conversation With James Hillman
By Genie Zeiger [August 2000]

“We’re supposedly a young nation; we’ve always worshiped get-up-and-go, doing things on your own, winner take all. But we’re also a practical nation, and we don’t realize the practical value of older people.”

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Sparrow, an author and Sun contributor, recommends this interview. He writes: “This interview is a concerted probing into what I would call the ‘science of the good.’ Both Zeiger and Hillman are courageous; they fight their own inertia. Though the topic is supposedly ‘aging,’ young people will also learn from them.”

What’s your favorite piece from The Sun? Tell us, and we may include your suggestion on our website and in our newsletter.

Writing from The Sun wins the Pushcart Prize

Two selections first published in The Sun have been awarded the Pushcart Prize, which honors exceptional writing from America’s small presses. Linda McCullough Moore's short story “Final Dispositions” [February 2009] and Amanda Rea’s essay “A Dead Man in Nashville” [May 2009] will be published in the anthology The Pushcart Prize XXXV: Best of the Small Presses (Pushcart Press), due out in November. Our congratulations to both authors.

What bloggers are saying

Gail Grenier Sweet’s “Next to Godliness: The Story behind Dr. Bronner’s Soap” [January 2001] reminds a political activist that a clean home can tame a chattering mind.

A mother trying to adopt an Ethiopian child responds to Doug Crandell’s essay “After All This Is Over” in the June 2010 issue.

Liz Crain blogs about interviewing her hero, Sandor Katz, in the May 2010 issue.

After reading Robert Adámy Duisberg’s essay “Beekeeper’s Boy” [May 2010], a West Coast pacifist describes the state of beekeeping in California.

Doc Searls, Sun contributor and co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto, recalls a lesson he learned about privacy and the media from D. Patrick Miller’s “Notes Toward a Journalism of Consciousness” [January 1990].

The Sun in Big Sur, California
Weekend with Sun authors

Into The Fire
The Sun Celebrates Personal Writing

Join Sun authors, readers, and staff — including editor and publisher Sy Safransky — for a lively weekend of conversation, reflection, and inspiration. The Sun will host a gathering on October 22–24 at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California.

Online registration is now available; click here for details. Spaces fill quickly, so we recommend registering soon.

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