0 Items

The Sun Magazine

Contributors

June 2003

Writers

John Bargowski lives on a couple of acres of rich Jersey loam along the Delaware River, where he enjoys gardening and spending time with his family. He is the recipient of a New Jersey State Council on the Arts fellowship and the Theodore Roethke prize.

More ▸

Ellen Bass’s most recent book of poetry is Mules of Love (BOA Editions). She teaches creative writing in Santa Cruz, California.

More ▸

Mark Brazaitis is the author of The River of Lost Voices: Stories from Guatemala (University of Iowa Press) and the novel Steal My Heart (Van Neste Books). He lives in Morgantown, West Virginia, with his wife and two daughters.

More ▸

Robert P. Cooke lives in Highland, Indiana, where he writes poetry and works at a refinery.

More ▸

After graduating from Boston University with a degree in broadcast journalism, Arnie Cooper took a job as a “reproduction specialist,” which meant he spent many hours photocopying other people’s writing. He went on to teach English as a second language, returning to writing just five years ago. He lives in Santa Barbara, California, and his work has appeared in Orion, Yoga Journal, and Mother Jones.

More ▸

Doug Crandell grew up on a hog farm and has worked in a ceiling-tile factory, an auto shop, a mop factory, and a steel mill. His first novel, Man vs. Nature (portions of which appeared in the Indiana Review, Nebraska Review, and Night Train), is scheduled to be published in 2004 by Ludlow Press, a new Lower East Side publishing house. He lives in Smyrna, Georgia.

More ▸

Richard Lehnert has lived in northern New Mexico for twenty-two years, the last three with his wife, Susannah Tyrrell. He was for many years the music editor of Stereophile magazine, and since 1996 has worked as a freelance editor. His first book of poems, A Short History of the Usual, will be published this year by Backwaters Press. His work has appeared in the Southern Review, the Nebraska Review, and the Laurel Review, among others.

More ▸

Liza Taylor’s fiction and essays have appeared in Sojourner, the Los Angeles Times, and the Santa Monica Review. Her novel The Drummer Was the First to Die (St. Martin’s Press) continues to be required reading in epidemiology courses across the country. Her loves include horticulture, bluegrass guitar, fabric art, world travel, and lying on the couch with a good novel and a glass of something cold. She lives in Michigan with her hunk of a husband and their two radiant, unruly sons.

More ▸

Genie Zeiger lives in the hills of western Massachusetts with her husband and her canary Zeke, who often sings as she writes. Her memoir How I Find Her: A Mother’s Dying and a Daughter’s Life was just published in Germany, and she has taped a selection from it (in English) for NPR’s All Things Considered. She’s looking forward to meeting Sun readers at the upcoming fall retreats.

More ▸

Photographers

Gloria Baker Feinstein has been taking photographs since she was three years old. When not out taking pictures, she is busy raising her children in Kansas City, Missouri.

More ▸

In addition to his photography, Gary M. Haskins writes poetry, makes pottery, and practices sumi-e — Japanese ink painting. He lives in Hawthorne, Florida.

More ▸

Patricia Richards takes photos of what she knows: her home, family, friends, and neighbors in Plano, Texas.

More ▸

Linda Sole is a freelance photographer based in London, England. She specializes in documentary photography and photojournalism.

More ▸

Debra Sugerman is a photographer living in Montpelier, Vermont.

More ▸

Morgan Tyree lives in Powell, Wyoming. His biggest fantasy these days is to have sourdough pancakes and coffee with country singer Mary Chapin Carpenter.

More ▸

Suzi Q. Varin’s photograph in this issue was taken while she toured the U.S. in a giant toaster to promote a cookbook. She lives in Redwood City, California.

More ▸

Hiroshi Watanabe’s photographs have been published in Japan, England, and the U.S. He lives in West Hollywood, California, and can be reached through his website.

More ▸

Lynne Jaeger Weinstein’s photographs have appeared in Parenting, Orion, and the New York Times. Her work has been exhibited in New York City and near her home in southern Vermont.

More ▸

Lisa Wiltse is a freelance photojournalist who lives in Brooklyn, New York.

More ▸

On The Cover

Perry Dilbeck’s photo of Jack Parris is part of an ongoing series about endangered small farms in the South. Parris, who is in his eighties, has farmed for more than fifty years. He grows a variety of vegetables for his family and sells what’s left over at a roadside stand that operates on the honor system. Dilbeck lives in Locust Grove, Georgia, and uses a plastic Holga camera for much of his work; he finds that people are much less intimidated by a stranger with a cheap toy camera than they are by someone weighed down with expensive professional equipment.

More ▸
We’re Counting on You

If you value The Sun, please make a tax-deductible donation to keep this independent, ad-free magazine alive.

Donate Today