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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

December 2004

Writers

Ellen Bass’s most recent book, Mules of Love (BOA Editions), won the Lambda Literary Award for Poetry. In 1973 she coedited No More Masks! (Perennial), the first major collection of women’s poetry, and she is coauthor of The Courage to Heal (Perennial). She teaches poetry and creative writing in Santa Cruz, California.

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Brian Buckbee divides his time between Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and Missoula, Montana. His short story in this issue is from a book he is completing titled Dear Dipshit: Letters to My Dumb, Future Self. His work has appeared in Threepenny Review, Mid-American Review, and Shenandoah.

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Michelle Cacho-Negrete lives in a historic granite quarry in Maine, where she conducts writing workshops, contemplates the frightening decline in frog populations, and writes essays and short stories. Her work has been published in Weird Tales, Psychotherapy Networker, and other magazines, both reputable and disreputable.

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Alan Craig is the pseudonym of a writer who has had several essays published in The Sun.

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Alison Luterman lives in Oakland, California. Her second book of poems, See How We Almost Fly, is forthcoming in 2005.

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Julie Reichert writes, teaches, and makes movies in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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David Romtvedt lives in Buffalo, Wyoming, and last summer was appointed poet laureate of the state. He contributed to and coedited the anthology Deep West: A Literary Tour of Wyoming (Pronghorn Press) and has poems forthcoming in Ploughshares and Prairie Schooner. In addition to writing poetry and essays, he performs dance music of the Americas with his group the Fireants.

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Sy Safransky is editor of The Sun.

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Angela Winter satisfies the left side of her brain by managing projects at The Sun and the right by singing, tending flowers, and working with clients in her Polarity Therapy practice. She lives in Carrboro, North Carolina.

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Photographers

Doug Beasley lives in St. Paul, Minnesota, in a small wooden house surrounded by trees, where he tends his Japanese gardens. He is a lover of late-night discussions and strong morning coffee.

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Tom Becker lives in a small town in Iowa. He collects his paycheck as a commercial photographer but his passion is for the sort of photography that doesn’t pay the bills.

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William Carter is a photographer living in Los Altos Hills, California.

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Dianne Duenzl is a photographer living in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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Duncan Green is the staff photographer for the Washington State House of Representatives. He lives in Olympia.

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Jeffrey Hersch lives and takes photographs in Denver, Colorado.

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Tricia Hill lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, and dabbles in photography. She admits her first-grade teacher was correct that she’s a “worry-wart,” but she no longer believes that she will develop warts all over as a result.

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Jason Langer lives in San Francisco and is an adjunct teacher at Academy of Art University. His photographs have appeared in Spin, Time, and Vanity Fair.

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Alan Mass is a photographer living in Brooklyn, New York.

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Julie McCarthy is a freelance photographer living in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. She says that she fully intends to die with camera in hand — just not anytime soon.

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John Rosenthal is a photographer, writer, and public-radio commentator who lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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Carla Shapiro lives in Chichester, New York. Her photograph in this issue is of her grandmother.

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Chip Thomas is a photographer and medical doctor who works at the Inscription House Health Center in Shonto, Arizona.

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Harry Wilson is a photographer living in Bakersfield, California.

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Bill Witt is a former Peace Corps volunteer and factory worker who served for ten years as a state representative in Iowa. He lives and takes photographs in Cedar Falls.

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On The Cover

Kevin Bubriski’s home is in southern Vermont, but he lived in Asia for a number of years. He took this month’s cover photograph in Nepal in 1977, while he was working for the Peace Corps, bringing water to the first high school in the Mugu District. The area suffered from severe food shortages, and one of the few sources of fat and oil was apricot pits. In the picture a woman mashes the pits into a paste on a stone heated by a small fire. The villagers used the oil for cooking, massage, and hair grooming.

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