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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

January 2005

Writers

Kent Annan and his wife, Shelly Satran, work for a grass-roots development organization in Haiti. He’s disappointed that the four-month avocado season in their area is coming to a close, but that means mango season is drawing closer.

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Antler has won the Pushcart Prize and the Walt Whitman Award. He is the author of three collections of poetry, including Antler: Selected Poems (Soft Skull Press). His new chapbook, Exclamation Points, Ad Infinitum!, is available from Centennial Press. He lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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Jenny Bitner is a San Francisco poet turned fiction writer and visual artist. Her short story “The Pamphleteer” was selected for the Best American Non-required Reading 2002. Currently she’s writing a novel titled Notes to a Potential Lover. Her writing has appeared in Kitchen Sink, Mid-American Review, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, and Men’s Health.

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Jean Hay Bright is the author of Meanwhile, Next Door to the Good Life and Proud to Be a Card-Carrying, Flag-Waving, Patriotic American Liberal (both BrightBerry Press). She lives in Dixmont, Maine.

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Pema Chödrön is the resident teacher at Gampo Abbey in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, the first Tibetan monastery for Westerners. She has authored several books, including The Places That Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times (Shambhala Publications).

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Sherri L. Hopper currently lives in the desert Southwest. She really wants to go home, only she doesn’t know where home is anymore.

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James Kullander holds a master of divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in New York City. A writer and editor, he lives in the Hudson Valley of upstate New York.

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Sy Safransky is editor of The Sun.

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Ira Sukrungruang is a first-generation Thai American born and raised in Chicago. His work has appeared in Witness, North American Review, and River Styx. He is coeditor of What Are You Looking At? The First Fat Fiction Anthology (Harcourt) and Scoot Over, Skinny: The Fat Nonfiction Anthology, out this month from Harvest Books. He teaches creative writing at State University of New York in Oswego.

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Theresa Williams’s novel The Secret of Hurricanes (MacAdam/Cage) was a finalist for the Paterson Fiction Prize in 2003. She lives in Ohio on a twelve-acre farm with her husband and ten cats.

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Photographers

Maureen Beitler is a photographer and nurse living in New York City.

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Rita Bernstein is a photographer and former civil-rights lawyer who lives in Philadelphia.

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James Carroll is a photographer living in New York City.

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Perry Dilbeck lives in Locust Grove, Georgia, and teaches at the Art Institute of Atlanta. His photographs chronicle the disappearing lifestyle of small farmers in the South.

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Susi Eggenberger decided to pursue her love of photography after ending a twenty-two-year career in nursing. She lives in Arundel, Maine.

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Jeffrey Hersch lives and takes photographs in Denver, Colorado.

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Matthew O. Nighswander is a photographer living in New York City.

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David Shannon lives in Seattle, Washington, and can often be found roaming the mountains or in the midst of protesting crowds. His photo in this issue was taken in Ayutthaya, the old capital of Thailand. His next project is to try to beat his wife in a game of Scrabble.

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Jennifer Shaw is a fine-art and freelance photographer living in New Orleans.

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Helen M. Stummer has been a documentary photographer for more than thirty years. She lives in Metuchen, New Jersey, and is the author of the book of photographs No Easy Walk, Newark, 1980-1993 (Temple University Press).

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Jacqueline Véissid is a photographer living in Los Angeles.

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Jenny Warburg is a freelance photographer and political activist living in Durham, North Carolina.

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Madeline Wilson is a photographer who works, lives, and teaches in the Hudson Valley north of Manhattan.

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On The Cover

Ethan Hubbard lives in Montpelier, Vermont, and travels the world, photographing the people he meets. The Pilgrim Press has published two books of his photographs, The Face of a Man and The Face of a Woman. He took this month’s cover photograph in the Buddhist village of Pisang, Nepal, after hiking winding mountain trails for two weeks. The man on the cover, a Tibetan farmer, invited Hubbard to stay in his house, which Hubbard describes as “a single smoky room illuminated by candles and several fireplaces.” The farmer is holding a prayer wheel.

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