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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

August 2019

Writers

Joseph Bruchac is a writer and professional storyteller who lives in Greenfield Center, New York.

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Laura Da’ is the author of the poetry collections Tributaries and Instruments of the True Measure. She lives near Seattle with her husband and son.

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Kelly Daniels is an associate professor of English at Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois. He lives in Le Claire, Iowa.

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Kristen Joy Emack is a photographer and public-school family liaison living in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Michael Galinsky is a photographer and the codirector of All the Rage, a documentary about Dr. John Sarno. He lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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Jerry Gay is a Pulitzer Prize–winning photographer and the author of Seeing Reality. He lives in Everett, Washington.

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Tytia Habing used to work as a horticulturist in the Cayman Islands, where she was bitten by the most endangered iguana on earth. She now lives in Watson, Illinois.

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Joy Harjo is the author of the memoir Crazy Brave and eight collections of poetry. She was recently selected as the 23rd U.S. poet laureate.

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Linda Hogan is the writer in residence for the Chickasaw Nation. Her works include the poetry collection Dark. Sweet. and the novels Mean Spirit and People of the Whale.

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Edis Jurčys lives in Portland, Oregon, where he bakes bread and dances the tango.

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Mark Leviton saw How the West Was Won when he was ten years old and has never quite recovered from its violent depiction of Native Americans. He lives in Nevada City, California.

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Denise Low, a former Kansas poet laureate, is the copublisher of Mammoth Publications, a press specializing in indigenous American authors.

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Jan Phillips is the founder of the Livingkindness Foundation, which provides educational opportunities to people in Nigeria. She lives in San Diego, California.

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Boomer Pinches’s fiction and poetry have appeared in Tin House, Narrative, The Massachusetts Review, and elsewhere. He lives in Northampton, Massachusetts.

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Elizabeth Poliner directs the creative-writing programs at Hollins University in Roanoke, Virginia. She’s spending the summer on the coast of Maine, writing and breathing its good air.

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Paul Chaat Smith is a Comanche author and the associate curator of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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M.L. Smoker is the author of the poetry collection Another Attempt at Rescue and the coeditor of I Go to the Ruined Place: Contemporary Poems in Defense of Global Human Rights.

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Wendy Stone lives in Woodstock, Connecticut, where she decorates her house with an over-the-top display of Christmas lights.

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Gwen Westerman is the director of the humanities program at Minnesota State University, Mankato. She is the author of Follow the Blackbirds, a collection of poetry in Dakota and English.

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Photographers

Gina Easley lives in Eugene, Oregon. She recently visited Japan, where she was pleasantly surprised by the quietness of crowded spaces.

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Robert Graham is the art director of The Sun. He lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

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Corey Hendrickson is a photographer, husband, and father who lives in Middlebury, Vermont.

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Erik Nielsen is a recent college graduate who is embarrassed by his delinquent high-school years. He lives in Staten Island, New York.

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Gretchen Seifert lives and works on a permaculture farm in Missouri with her husband and a coop full of chickens.

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Matika Wilbur, the creator of Project 562, has photographed more than 300 of the 562 federally recognized Native American tribes in the U.S. She has traveled by plane, boat, horseback, and in her RV, the Big Girl.

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On The Cover

Frank Lavelle was a photographer who died in 2018. He took the photograph on this month’s cover, of two girls in matching bathing suits, in County Galway, Ireland, in 1983.

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