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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

December 2002

Writers

Jimmy Santiago Baca was born in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has written several books of poetry and received numerous awards, including the National Endowment of Poetry Award, the Pushcart Prize, and the American Book Award. His latest book, A Place to Stand (Grove Press), is a memoir about his childhood and his years in prison.

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Colin Chisholm lives in Missoula, Montana. His book Through Yup’ik Eyes: An Adopted Son Explores the Landscape of Family is available from Alaska Northwest Books. On the same day The Sun accepted his story “Flesh and Blood” for publication, he was reunited with his birth mother.

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Alison Luterman is a poet and essayist living in Oakland, California, where she offers creative-writing classes in her living room. Her book of poetry The Largest Possible Life is available from Cleveland State University Press. She recently completed a play called Saying Kaddish with My Sister.

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D. Patrick Miller is an author, editor, and independent publisher in Berkeley, California, whose latest book is News of a New Human Nature (Fearless Books), an updated collection of his best magazine work from the past twenty years, including many essays and interviews that originally appeared in The Sun. He also writes the column “News of a New Human Nature” on his website, www.fearlessbooks.com.

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Sy Safransky is editor of The Sun.

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Sybil Smith lives in Vermont and works as a nurse in the Vermont jails, which is not as scary as it may sound. She was a finalist in Night Train’s summer 2002 Fifty-Fifty Fiction Award. Her essay in this issue is adapted from an unpublished book titled My Mother’s Early Lovers. In 1996, the manuscript was made into a movie that won prizes at the Yale Film Festival and the Maine International Film Festival. She is currently in search of a publisher.

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At his thirtieth high-school reunion, Sparrow danced to “Play That Funky Music, White Boy” with a criminal lawyer. He describes his latest book, Yes, You ARE a Revolutionary: Plus 7 Other Books (Soft Skull Press), as “a compilation of my greatest hits, as I define them.” He lives in Phoenicia, New York, where he anxiously awaits the NEA’s response to his grant proposal.

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Photographers

Roy Arenella lives in New York City.

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James Carroll lives in New York City.

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William Carter lives in Los Altos Hills, California.

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Karen Cunningham lives in New York City.

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Duncan Green lives in Olympia, Washington.

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Lance Jones lives in Ira, Vermont.

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Robyn McDaniels lives in Audubon, Minnesota.

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Lake Newton lives in Memphis, Tennessee.

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Matthew Nighswander lives in New York City.

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Alan Sirulnikoff lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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Linda Smogor lives in Eugene, Oregon.

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Mark Townsend lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Thomas Tulis lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

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On The Cover

Irving Goldworm took this month’s cover photograph in the midsixties at a reform school outside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The facility was built in the early nineteenth century and had been in continuous use ever since. Goldworm, who had only recently taken up photography, went there to document what he had seen during a social-work internship at the school several years earlier. “I feared that I’d have difficulty getting permission from the director to take pictures,” he says, “but he gave me carte blanche. He was proud of the facility he ran.” Solitary confinement, in a cell like the one pictured, was used as punishment when other efforts to get a boy to behave had failed.

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